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Kidney Diseases

Haemodialysis

While performing haemodialysis, blood is taken out from the body and filtered through an artificial kidney or dialyser, then cleansed and transferred back to the body. This transferring procedure of the blood requires an access point. There are three types of access points—the arteriovenous (AV) fistula, AV graft and central venous catheter. If a fistula or graft is used to access the blood, two needles will be placed at the beginning of the treatment. These needles are further inserted into two soft tubes that are connected to the dialysis machine. With the help of these tubes and needles, the blood will pass, get cleaned and be sent back to the body. If a catheter is used, it negates the use of needles and can be directly connected to the dialysis tubes. The doctor decides which access is appropriate for the patient. Haemodialysis is mostly advised for patients at the end stage of renal disease. Though it is an effective method, haemodialysis does not provide a complete cure for kidney failure.

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